Let's dance! 
Exhibit Catalog [PDF]



Almost 100 years ago, with the dawn of the Jazz Age, life changed dramatically for women in America.

Suddenly the 1920s woman could vote, drive, spend her own money, smoke and drink in public, cut off her long hair, expose her calves, forgo her corset and—perhaps most iconic of all—she could
dance.



The most iconic pastime of the 1920s was dancing in nightclubs and speakeasies. Here women and men could freely socialize to the rhythm of Hot Jazz.

That rhythm is most clearly made visual in the image of the flapper, with her (relatively) short dress, which sparkled in the dim lights, given heft, form and movement by the innumerable beads sewed to its simple shift-shaped form.

These dresses, like the Jazz Age itself, were never destined to last. With the weight of the beads continually testing their union with the fragile silk, their eventual collapse was inevitable, as evidenced by the beads abandoned on the dance floor when the party was over.

This is why, though the dresses remained the quintessential symbol of the times, so few of them remain today. By attentive restoration, we have been able to present examples of these dresses as they appeared when they first shone, as well as fascinating examples of dresses in different stages of construction process.



The deadline for this show has officially been extended! Contact us to book your tour.

•    Tours are $3.00/person, scheduled for Mon., Fri., and Sat., at either 1:00 or 3:00 PM.
•    Tours have a (2) person minimum and a (10) person maximum.
•    Please note that the third floor gallery is only accessible via stairs at this time.